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home : news : national news free May 11, 2021

US schools fight to keep students amid fear of dropout surge
U.S. educators are doing everything they can to track down high school students who stopped showing up to classes and to help them get the credits needed to graduate, amid an anticipated surge in the country's dropout rate during the coronavirus pandemic.

There isn't data available yet on how the pandemic has affected the nation's overall dropout rate — 2019 is the last year for which it is available — and many school officials say it's too early to know how many students who stopped logging on for distance learning don't plan to return. But soaring numbers of students who are failing classes or are chronically absent have experts fearing the worst, and schools have been busy tracking down wayward seniors through social media, knocking on their doors, assigning staff to help them make up for lost time and, in some cases, even relaxing graduation requirements.

Tuesday, May 11, 2021


14-year-old boy charged in girl's death expected in court
Classmates, friends and family members gathered for a candlelight vigil in honor of a 13-year-old cheerleader whose body was found in the northeast Florida woods. Authorities said her community pointed to a 14-year-old neighbor in her death.

The juvenile made his first appearance in court, via a Zoom call which his parents were also on. A judge ordered him held on a second-degree murder charge for 21 days in the death of Tristyn Bailey. State attorney’s officials told the judge they would likely have a decision by then on whether he will be tried as an adult.

Tuesday, May 11, 2021

Political newcomer Young wins Virginia GOP Governor's race
Glenn Youngkin, a political newcomer who campaigned as a conservative, Christian outsider, bested a field of seven candidates to emerge as Virginia Republicans’ nominee for governor, in a year when the GOP hopes to end a 12-year losing streak in statewide races.

Youngkin defeated a hard-right contender in state Sen. Amanda Chase, who closely aligned herself with former President Donald Trump, as well as an establishment candidate, former House Speaker Kirk Cox, who had more than 30 years’ experience in government as well as the endorsements of former governors George Allen and Bob McDonnell.

Tuesday, May 11, 2021

Migrant children held in mass shelters with little oversight
The Biden administration is holding tens of thousands of asylum-seeking children in an opaque network of some 200 facilities that The Associated Press has learned spans two dozen states and includes five shelters with more than 1,000 children packed inside.

Confidential data obtained by the AP shows the number of migrant children in government custody more than doubled in the past two months, and this week the federal government was housing around 21,000 kids, from toddlers to teens. A facility at Fort Bliss, a U.S. Army post in El Paso, Texas, had more than 4,500 children as of Monday. Attorneys, advocates and mental health experts say that while some shelters are safe and provide adequate care, others are endangering children’s health and safety.

Tuesday, May 11, 2021

Preterm deliveries may pose long-term stroke risk for mothers
It's not surprising that babies born prematurely may face more health issues than those who were carried to term.

But new research suggests the same may apply to their mothers.

Tuesday, May 11, 2021

Senate advances variety of bills
Legislation that would overhaul sex education in Illinois and a measure to decriminalize the transmission of HIV were among several bills that passed the Senate Executive Committee Wednesday.

The committee, following a long and contentious debate, advanced legislation that would require public schools to teach sex ed by July 2023.

Monday, May 10, 2021

Job market: hiring, much competition

After a painful year of joblessness, the future has finally brightened for Alycia St. Germain, a 22-year-old college senior at the University of Minnesota.

Having lost a part-time gig at Barnes and Noble last March as the viral pandemic tore through the U.S. economy, she was left unemployed like tens of millions of other Americans. But now, St. Germain has a job lined up — with benefits — even before graduation and in her chosen field of developmental psychology. A family friend established a new child-care center in St. Paul, and St. Germain landed a job as an assistant in the infant room.

Monday, May 10, 2021

Gov. Brian Kemp set to repeal Georgia's 1863 citizen's arrest law
Gov. Brian Kemp plans to sign a repeal of Georgia’s Civil War-era citizen’s arrest law on Monday, a year after the fatal shooting of Ahmaud Arbery, a Black man pursued by white men who said they suspected him of a crime.

The state House and Senate passed House Bill 479 by overwhelming margins. Kemp and lawmakers made the bill one of their top priorities after Arbery’s killing.

Monday, May 10, 2021

Major US pipeline halts operations after ransomware attack
The federal government is working with the Georgia-based company that shut down a major pipeline transporting fuel across the East Coast after a ransomware attack, the White House says.

The government is planning for various scenarios and working with state and local authorities on measures to mitigate any potential supply issues, officials said Saturday. The attack is unlikely to affect gasoline supply and prices unless it leads to a prolonged shutdown, experts said.

Monday, May 10, 2021

Bosnia Serbs honor Nobel winner
Bosnian Serbs on Friday honored the controversial 2019 Nobel Literature Prize winner Peter Handke, who is known for his apologist views over Serb war crimes during the 1990s’ wars in the Balkans.

The Austrian novelist and screenwriter was welcomed by Bosnian Serb officials as he arrived in the northern town of Banja Luka, the main city in the Serb-run part of Bosnia. From there, Handke headed to the eastern town of Visegrad where he was received the literary award.

Saturday, May 8, 2021

California reports population drop
California’s population fell by more than 182,000 people in 2020, marking the first year-over-year loss ever recorded for the nation’s most populous state.

State officials announced Friday that California’s population dipped 0.46% to just under 39.5 million people from January 2020 to January 2021.

Saturday, May 8, 2021

U. S. job growth slows sharply; hiring struggles
The recovery of America’s job market hit a pause last month as many businesses — from restaurants and hotels to factories and construction companies — struggled to find enough workers to catch up with a rapidly strengthening economic rebound.

Employers added just 266,000 jobs in April, sharply lower than in March and far fewer than economists had expected. With viral cases declining and states and localities easing restrictions, the recovery from the pandemic recession has been so fast that many businesses have been caught flat-footed in the face of surging consumer demand.

Saturday, May 8, 2021

Israeli troops kill 2 Palestinians attackers
Israeli troops shot and killed two Palestinians and wounded a third after the men opened fire on a base in the occupied West Bank on Friday, the latest in a series of violent confrontations amid soaring tensions in Jerusalem.

Dozens of Palestinians in an east Jerusalem neighborhood are at risk of being evicted following a long legal battle with Israeli settlers, and Palestinian protesters have clashed with Israeli police in the city on a nightly basis since the start of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan.

Saturday, May 8, 2021

In a small New Hampshire town, the 2020 election still rages
Meetings of the Windham Board of Selectmen are usually as sleepy as they sound — a handful of residents from the New Hampshire town, a discussion of ambulance fees, maybe a drainage study.

So when a crowd of about 500 people showed up last week, some waving American flags, carrying bullhorns and lifting signs questioning the presidential election, Bruce Breton knew things were about to change.

The crowd at the Monday meeting had been fired up by conservative media, which in recent weeks has seized on the town’s election results for four seats in the state House as suspect. The attention, fanned by a Donald Trump adviser who happens to be a Windham resident, has helped a routine recount spiral, ultimately engulfing the town in a false theory that the national election was stolen from Trump.

Saturday, May 8, 2021

Online speech shield under fire
Lurking beneath Facebook's decision on whether to continue Donald Trump's suspension from its platform is a far more complex and consequential question: Do the protections carved out for companies when the internet was in its infancy 25 years ago make sense when some of them have become global powerhouses with almost unlimited reach?

The companies have provided a powerful megaphone for Trump, other world leaders and billions of users to air their grievances, even ones that are false or damaging to someone's reputation, knowing that the platforms themselves were shielded from liability for content posted by users.

Saturday, May 8, 2021

Bomb kills at least 25 people in Afghan capital
A bomb exploded near a school in a majority Shiite district of west Kabul on Saturday, killing at least 25 people, many them young students, Afghan government spokesmen said. The Taliban condemned the attack apparently aimed at civilians, and denied any responsibility.

Ambulances were rushing to evacuate wounded from the scene of the blast near Syed Al-Shahda school, in the Shiite majority neighborhood of Dasht-e-Barchi, Interior Ministry spokesman Tariq Arian said.

Saturday, May 8, 2021

Last wild macaw in Rio is lonely and looking for love
Some have claimed she's indulging a forbidden romance. More likely, loneliness compels her to seek company at Rio de Janeiro's zoo.

Either way, a blue-and-yellow macaw that zookeepers named Juliet is believed to be the only wild bird of its kind left in the Brazilian city where the birds once flew far and wide.

Saturday, May 8, 2021

As US reopens, campuses tighten restrictions for virus
About a year into mask mandates, nasal swabs and remote classes, the atmosphere turned tense at the University of Vermont as the school cracked down on rules for social distancing and face coverings amid a spike in student COVID-19 cases.

Students were handed hundreds of citations for violations like standing in another student’s doorway or walking maskless to a hallway restroom, igniting a student-led petition that blasted “strict and inhumane living conditions.”

“You start to feel suffocated like I’m afraid to leave my room,” freshman Patrick Welsh said in an interview on campus.

Saturday, May 8, 2021

NASA Mars helicopter heard humming
First came the amazing pictures, then the video. Now NASA is sharing sounds of its little helicopter humming through the thin Martian air.

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California released this first-ever audio Friday, just before Ingenuity was set to soar on its fifth test flight.

Friday, May 7, 2021

Talks intensify on bringing United States back to Iran nuclear deal
World powers held a fourth round of high-level talks Friday in Austria aimed at bringing the United States back into the nuclear deal with Iran, with both sides signaling a willingness to work out the major stumbling blocks.

The talks began in early April and Russian delegate Mikhail Ulyanov tweeted following Friday’s meeting that “the participants agreed on the need to intensify the process.”

Friday, May 7, 2021

National Day of Prayer makes pleas for unity, justice
U.S. soldiers were fighting in Korea when President Harry S. Truman signed a congressional resolution calling for an annual National Day of Prayer. The purpose was for people to gather in houses of worship to pray for world peace, according to an Associated Press report from April 17, 1952.

Since 1988 the event has taken place on the first Thursday in May, diligently observed by some churches, ignored by others. The 70th edition this week comes after a year wracked by a devastating pandemic, political polarization and turmoil related to racial injustice.

Thursday, May 6, 2021

Britain to ask G-7 for climate resources
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said Thursday that he will use the Group of Seven meeting in June to “bend the ear” of fellow leaders to provide more financial help for poor countries to cope with climate change.

Johnson said governments have six months to resolve numerous thorny diplomatic issues, including making good on a $100-billion climate fund that was meant to go to developing nations each year from 2020.

Thursday, May 6, 2021

Biden pushes infrastructure in GOP stronghold
President Joe Biden will push the case for his $2.3 trillion infrastructure plan in the reliably Republican state of Louisiana — directly challenging GOP lawmakers who say that low taxes for corporations and the wealthy will fuel economic growth.

Biden is leaning into the stagecraft of the presidency on Thursday by choosing to speak in the city of Lake Charles in front of a 70-year-old bridge that is 20 years past its designed lifespan.

Thursday, May 6, 2021

5 critical steps to help prevent a stroke
If there's one good thing that can be said of strokes, it's this: The vast majority of them don't need to happen.

Up to 80% of strokes can be prevented through healthy lifestyle changes and working with health care practitioners to control stroke risk factors. Researchers have identified numerous steps people can take to lower stroke risk, but health experts agree, trying to do them all at once can feel overwhelming.

Thursday, May 6, 2021

Justice Dept. ordered to release memo
A federal judge has ordered the release of a legal memorandum the Trump-era Justice Department prepared for then-Attorney General William Barr before he announced his conclusion that President Donald Trump had not obstructed justice during the Russia investigation.

The Justice Department had refused to give the March 24, 2019, memorandum to a government transparency group that requested it under the Freedom of Information Act, saying the document represented the private advice of lawyers and was produced before any formal decision had been made and was therefore exempt from disclosure under public records law.

But U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson said the Justice Department had obscured “the true purpose of the memorandum” when it withheld the document.

Wednesday, May 5, 2021

No. 2 House Republican backs Cheney ouster over Trump barbs
The No. 2 House Republican publicly called Wednesday for the removal of Rep. Liz Cheney from the party’s leadership, adding momentum to the drive to topple her after she clashed repeatedly with former President Donald Trump.

Rep. Steve Scalise, the House GOP whip, is backing New York GOP Rep. Elise Stefanik for Cheney’s post, said Scalise spokesperson Lauren Fine. The public statement from the Louisiana Republican was the first explicit call from GOP leadership for the ouster of Cheney from the party’s No. 3 leadership job.

Wednesday, May 5, 2021

4 people killed in plane crash
Four people were killed when a small plane crashed into a home in Mississippi late Tuesday night, police said.

Authorities in Hattiesburg were called to the scene of the civilian plane crash just before 11:30 p.m., Hattiesburg Police Public Information Officer Ryan Moore said.

Wednesday, May 5, 2021

Trillions of cicadas about to emerge from 15 states
Sifting through a shovel load of dirt in a suburban backyard, Michael Raupp and Paula Shrewsbury find their quarry: a cicada nymph.

And then another. And another. And four more.

In maybe a third of a square foot of dirt, the University of Maryland entomologists find at least seven cicadas — a rate just shy of a million per acre. A nearby yard yielded a rate closer to 1.5 million.

Wednesday, May 5, 2021

Space wine for sale with $1 million price tag
The wine is out of this world. The price is appropriately stratospheric.

Christie's said Tuesday it is selling a bottle of French wine that spent more than a year in orbit aboard the International Space Station. The auction house thinks a wine connoisseur might pay as much as $1 million to own it.

The Pétrus 2000 is one of 12 bottles sent into space in November 2019 by researchers exploring the potential for extraterrestrial agriculture. It returned 14 months later subtly altered, according to wine experts who sampled it at a tasting in France.

Tuesday, May 4, 2021

Trade deficit hits record $74.4 billion
The U.S. trade deficit surged to a record $74.4 billion in March as an improving U.S. economy drove purchases of imported foreign goods.

The deficit, the gap between what America buys from abroad and what it sells to other countries, was 5.6% greater than the February gap of $70.5 billion, the Commerce Department reported Tuesday.

Imports rose 6.3% to $274.5 billion while exports increased 6.6% to $200 billion. The U.S. imports so much more than it exports that in dollar terms, the rise in imports was greater.

Tuesday, May 4, 2021

'Whose Big Lie?': Trump's proclamation a new GOP litmus test
Donald Trump and his supporters are intensifying efforts to shame — and potentially remove — members of their party who are seen as disloyal to the former president and his false claims that last year’s election was stolen from him.

On Capitol Hill, Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming, the No. 3 Republican in the House, risks losing her leadership post amid her increasingly public dispute with Trump. In Utah, Sen. Mitt Romney, a rare Trump foe in the GOP, faced the indignity over the weekend of reminding a booing crowd that he was once their presidential standard-bearer. And in Texas, the only openly anti-Trump Republican in a crowded special election for a congressional seat finished a lowly 9th.

Tuesday, May 4, 2021

Mummified remains found in Colorado home
Authorities have arrested several people after the mummified body of the leader of the spiritual group "Love Has Won" was found wrapped in a sleeping bag and decorated with Christmas lights in a southern Colorado home.

Amy Carlson, 45, who was known as "Mother God" by her followers, was found dead in a home in the tiny, rural town of Moffat on Wednesday, April 28, according to arrest affidavits for seven people, who are each charged with abuse of a corpse.

Tuesday, May 4, 2021

Worker finds human foot on Southern California freeway
Authorities are investigating after a human foot was found Monday on a Southern California freeway.

The foot was discovered by a California Department of Transportation employee who was working on the center median of Interstate 210 in San Bernardino, California Highway Patrol Officer Ivan Sandoval said.

Tuesday, May 4, 2021

Mealworms food of the future?
Dried yellow mealworms could soon be hitting supermarket shelves and restaurants across Europe.

The European Union's 27 nations gave the greenlight Tuesday to a proposal to put the Tenebrio molitor beetle's larvae on the market as a "novel food."

Tuesday, May 4, 2021

As pre-pandemic activities return, so does anxiety
Denise Santos remembers exactly how she felt when the first pandemic lockdown was ordered last year, knowing she'd no longer have to interact with the public, her co-workers or anybody outside the sanctuary of her home.

"The relief was immediate and almost overwhelming, like I'd slid into a warm bath," said Santos, who is one of 15 million Americans living with social anxiety.

Now, more than a year later, as vaccination rates rise, restrictions loosen and social activity resumes, the sounds of backyard barbecues, the sight of bigger crowds at local stores and the thought of entering a public workspace make her heart race.

Tuesday, May 4, 2021

Facebook oversight board to rule on the suspended Trump account
Former President Donald Trump will find out this week whether he gets to return to Facebook.

The social network’s quasi-independent Oversight Board says it will announce its decision Wednesday on a case concerning the former president.

Monday, May 3, 2021

Public transit hopes to win back riders after crushing year from COVID
Taking the Los Angeles Metro for his first trip in months, Brad Hudson felt a moment of normalcy when the train rolled into the South Pasadena, California, station, harkening back to his daily commute into LA before the coronavirus pandemic.

Then Hudson boarded the train, and reality set in.

Monday, May 3, 2021

At least 3 killed, many hurt in boat capsize off San Diego
A packed boat suspected of being used in a human smuggling operation capsized and broke apart in powerful surf along the rocky San Diego coast, killing at least three people and injuring more than two dozen others, authorities said.

Lifeguards, the U.S. Coast Guard and other agencies responded around 10:30 a.m. Sunday following reports of an overturned vessel in the waves near the rugged peninsula of Point Loma, according to the San Diego Fire-Rescue Department.

Monday, May 3, 2021

100 years old: Low key centenary for Northern Ireland
Queen Elizabeth II stressed the need for "reconciliation, equality and mutual understanding" as she sent her "warmest best wishes" to the people of Northern Ireland on Monday to mark what is widely considered to be its centenary.

Northern Ireland was created on May 3, 1921, when the Government of Ireland Act came into effect and partitioned the island of Ireland into two separate entities. Northern Ireland became part of the U.K. alongside England, Scotland and Wales, while Ireland would later in the year become what was then known as the Irish Free State.

Monday, May 3, 2021

22 endangered turtles released at DuPage County preserves
Nearly two dozen young endangered turtles have been released into the wild at a suburban Chicago nature preserve.

Twenty-two Blanding's turtles were released Wednesday at the Forest Preserves of DuPage County as part of a decades-long effort to rebuild populations of the semi-aquatic turtles in Illinois.

Monday, May 3, 2021

US denies Iran claims of prisoner deal; UK plays it down
The United States and Iran are in active talks over the release of prisoners, a person familiar with the discussions said Sunday as Washington denied a report by Iranian state-run television that deals had been struck.

Prisoner swaps between the U.S. and Iran are not uncommon and both countries in recent years have routinely sought the release of detainees. But any movement between the two countries is particularly sensitive as the Biden administration looks to restart nuclear talks. A 2015 atomic accord between the nations included prisoner exchanges.

Monday, May 3, 2021

Govt. should help Americans age at home
A majority of Americans agree that government should help people fulfill a widely held aspiration to age in their own homes, not institutional settings, a new poll finds.

There’s a surprising level of bipartisan agreement on some proposals that could help make that happen, according to the late March survey from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Still, Republicans lag Democrats in support of some policies, including the most far-reaching idea: Only 42% of Republicans favor a government long-term care insurance program for all Americans, compared with 78% of Democrats. Overall, 60% of the public supports that approach.

Monday, May 3, 2021

Mourners gathering Monday for funeral of Andrew Brown Jr.
Mourners will gather on Monday for the funeral of Andrew Brown Jr., a Black man shot and killed by deputies in North Carolina, with eulogists planning to celebrate his legacy and reflect on his life.
Monday, May 3, 2021

Police: 2 women, man dead in domestic shooting near Miami, Florida
Three people died and a man was wounded in a shooting that led to a brief standoff at a home southwest of Miami, police said.

Miami-Dade police were called to the neighborhood around 5 p.m. Sunday after a man ran to a neighbor’s house, saying he’d been shot by his son, news outlets reported. Two children also escaped the home, getting out safely, officials said.

Monday, May 3, 2021

Internet trailblazers Yahoo and AOL sold, again, for $5B
AOL and Yahoo are being sold again, this time to a private equity firm.

Verizon will sell Verizon Media, which consists of the pioneering tech platforms, to Apollo Global Management in a $5 billion deal.

Monday, May 3, 2021

March incomes surge; Spending jumps
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumer spending rose at the fastest pace in nine months while incomes soared by a record amount in March, reflecting billions of dollars in government support payments aimed at putting the country firmly on the road to recovery.
Saturday, May 1, 2021

Germany to return items looted items from colonial era
BERLIN (AP) — Germany is returning hundreds of artifacts known as Benin Bronzes that were mostly looted from western Africa by a British colonial expedition and subsequently sold to collections around the world, including German museums, authorities said Friday.
Friday, April 30, 2021

Pritzker unveils energy plan during final stretch
SPRINGFIELD — Gov. JB Pritzker’s office unveiled a 900-page energy overhaul bill Wednesday, accelerating a yearslong negotiating process which advocates hope will end in a comprehensive clean energy platform as the session nears its final month.
Friday, April 30, 2021

Eyeing 2024, Former VP Mike Pence says he'll push back on 'liberal agenda
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Former Vice President Mike Pence, positioning himself for a possible return to elected office, told an audience in early-voting South Carolina that he will spend the coming months “pushing back on the liberal agenda” he says is wrong for the country.
Friday, April 30, 2021

President Biden, President Carter, long-time allies, reconnect in Georgia
PLAINS, Ga. (AP) — President Joe Biden was a first-term Delaware senator in 1976 when he endorsed an upstart former Southern governor for the presidency over the party’s Northern establishment players.
Friday, April 30, 2021

Biden Sells economic plan in Georgia; Calls for rich to pay more in taxes
DULUTH, Ga. (AP) — President Joe Biden took his pitch to Georgia Thursday night for $4 trillion in spending to rebuild the nation's aged infrastructure and vastly expand the federal social safety net, choosing a new political battleground to make his case that Americans want a more activist government.
Friday, April 30, 2021

The year when clergy stress zoomed to a new high
When training pastors and chaplains, educators frequently stress the need for boundaries between work and home.
Friday, April 30, 2021

Greece keeps lid on Orthodox Easter events, readies tourism
ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Worshippers lined up at churches across Greece on Orthodox Good Friday as the government kept pandemic restrictions in place through the Easter holiday while preparing to restart services for tourists.
Friday, April 30, 2021

Former Army youth ministry director admits to sexual abuse
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (AP) — A former director of youth ministry at Fort Leonard Wood has pleaded guilty to sexually abusing four minors, including during the youth group's ski trips to Colorado and on camping trips.
Friday, April 30, 2021

Religious festival stampede in Israel kills 45, hurts dozens
JERUSALEM (AP) — A stampede at a religious festival attended by tens of thousands of ultra-Orthodox Jews in northern Israel killed at least 45 people and injured about 150 early Friday, medical officials said. It was one of the country's deadliest civilian disasters.
Friday, April 30, 2021

Russia targets lawyer over media comments on treason case
MOSCOW (AP) — Russian authorities have launched a criminal probe against a lawyer representing a former Russian journalist accused of treason and the team of imprisoned opposition leader Alexei Navalny, accusing him of disclosing information related to a police investigation.
Friday, April 30, 2021

Astronaut Michael Collins, Apollo 11 pilot, dead of cancer
Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins, who orbited the moon alone while Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin made their historic first steps on the lunar surface, died Wednesday. He was 90.

Collins died of cancer in Naples, Florida. “Mike always faced the challenges of life with grace and humility, and faced this, his final challenge, in the same way," his family said in a statement.

Thursday, April 29, 2021

Is all exercise equal? How to balance workouts to create the ideal fitness plan
Spring can be an ideal time to try a new exercise routine. Warmer temperatures make it enticing to head outdoors and, this year, more people might be considering a return to the gym after getting the COVID-19 vaccine.

While any regular physical activity can benefit your health, the ideal fitness plan requires the right balance.

Thursday, April 29, 2021

Chicago stages drive-through Wagner concert
Amid signs pointing “To Elevator” and advising drivers to “Take Parking Ticket With You,” the Rhinemaidens lament the theft of their gold, Siegfried is murdered, and Brunnhilde drives off in a red Mustang convertible to redeem the world.

Welcome to opera in an underground parking garage.

Wednesday, April 28, 2021

Girl Scout cookies take flight in drone deliveries
Missing out on Thin Mints in the pandemic? A Google affiliate is using drones to deliver Girl Scout cookies to people’s doorsteps in a Virginia community.

The town of Christiansburg has been a testing ground for commercial delivery drones operated by Wing, a subsidiary of Google’s corporate parent Alphabet.

Wednesday, April 28, 2021

Carmouche set to be 1st Black jockey in Kentucky Derby since 2013
Long before Kendrick Carmouche started riding horses growing up in Louisiana, Black jockeys were synonymous with the sport.

Black riders were atop 13 of the 15 horses in the first Kentucky Derby in 1875 and won 15 of the first 28 editions of the race. Everything has changed since: Carmouche on Saturday will be the first Black jockey in the Kentucky Derby since 2013 and is just one of a handful over the past century.

Wednesday, April 28, 2021

Student's Snapchat profanity leads to high court speech case
Fourteen-year-old Brandi Levy was having that kind of day where she just wanted to scream. So she did, in a profanity-laced posting on Snapchat that has, improbably, ended up before the Supreme Court in the most significant case on student speech in more than 50 years.

At issue is whether public schools can discipline students over something they say off-campus. The topic is especially meaningful in a time of remote learning because of the coronavirus pandemic and a rising awareness of the pernicious effects of online bullying.

Tuesday, April 27, 2021

Some cancer survivors could have increased risk for heart problems after hormone therapy
Hormone therapies used to treat breast and prostate cancers can raise the risk for a heart attack and stroke, according to a new scientific report that advises close monitoring.

The risk is even higher for people who have two or more risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, smoking or a family history of heart disease or stroke, according to the scientific statement issued Monday by the American Heart Association in its journal Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine.

Tuesday, April 27, 2021

Europe could allow travel by summer
American tourists could soon be visiting continental Europe again, more than a year after the European Union restricted travel to the 27-nation bloc to a bare minimum to contain the coronavirus.

EU officials said Monday they are completing plans to allow Americans back this summer, depending on the course of the outbreak on both sides of the Atlantic.

Monday, April 26, 2021

COVID treatment improved; Some wish for pill
If Priscila Medina had gotten COVID-19 a year ago, she would have had no treatments proven safe and effective to try. But when the 30-year-old nurse arrived at a Long Island hospital last month, so short of breath she could barely talk, doctors knew just what to do.

They quickly arranged for her to get a novel drug that supplies virus-blocking antibodies, and “by the next day I was able to get up and move around,” she said. After two days, “I really started turning the corner. I was showering, eating, playing with my son.”

Monday, April 26, 2021

'Pop' fans: President Joe Biden's kids, grandkids part of White House scene
President Joe Biden’s grandkids say anyone who wants to take a crack at their “Pop” has to go through them first. When Biden calls to check in, he doesn’t stop with one grandchild but ends up dialing all of them for updates. Even son Hunter Biden gets a nightly call from Biden.

Biden’s big Irish American family has been a prominent part of the White House scene during his first 100 days in office, with his wife, children and grandchildren providing the grounding that people close to the president say has served Biden during nearly a half century of public service.

Monday, April 26, 2021

Biden expanding summer food program for 34 million schoolchildren
The Biden administration is expanding a program to feed as many as 34 million schoolchildren during the summer months, using funds from the coronavirus relief package approved in March.

The Agriculture Department is announcing Monday that it will continue through the summer a payments program that replaced school meals because the pandemic left many children with virtual classes. Families of eligible children would receive $6.82 per child for each weekday. That adds up to $375 per child over the summer months.

Monday, April 26, 2021

Big ticket item orders up in March
Orders for big-ticket manufactured goods rebounded 0.5% in March as U.S. factories recovered from February weather disruptions. However, the recovery was not as strong as most had expected due to ongoing supply chain disruptions that continue to ensnare U.S. manufacturers.

It was the tenth time in the past 11 months that factory orders have increased with February being the exception, when orders declined 0.9% as severe winter storms raked much of the country.

Monday, April 26, 2021

Court to take up self-defense gun carry
The Supreme Court agreed on Monday to hear an appeal to expand gun rights in the United States in a New York case over the right to carry a firearm in public for self-defense.

The case marks the court’s first foray into gun rights since Justice Amy Coney Barrett came on board in October, making a 6-3 conservative majority.

Monday, April 26, 2021

Pain, loss linger a decade after tornadoes hammer six southern states
For Tom Sanders, it’s the void left by the death of a cousin and the man’s wife, killed when a tornado mowed through a placid Alabama valley. To Markedia Wells, it’s the stolen innocence of her sons, who still get nervous anytime it starts raining. Darryl Colburn laments a lost way of life in his hometown, which was all but leveled in seconds.

Waves of tornadoes pummeled the Eastern U.S. over four days in the spring of 2011, killing more than 320 people in six states, including about 250 who died in Alabama on April 27 of that year. A decade has passed, but time has been unable to erase the pain or replace the losses inflicted by the terrifying storms.

Monday, April 26, 2021

Former Kentucky guard Terrence Clarke dies in L.A. car crash
Kentucky says freshman guard Terrence Clarke died following a car accident in Los Angeles. He was 19.

The school announced Clarke’s death in a release Thursday night, but did not include any more details. Coach John Calipari said he was “absolutely gutted and sick tonight” and called the player “a beautiful kid, someone who owned the room with his personality, smile and joy.”

Saturday, April 24, 2021

Detectives: DNA solves 1985 slaying, rape of dementia victim
A DNA test has led to the arrest of a suspect in the April 1985 slaying, rape and kidnapping of a 78-year-old woman who had dementia and had wandered from her home.

The Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office announced Friday that it had arrested Richard C. Lange, 61, on first-degree murder, kidnapping and sexual assault charges.

Saturday, April 24, 2021

Biggest space station crowd in decade after SpaceX arrival
The International Space Station’s population swelled to 11 on Saturday with the jubilant arrival of SpaceX’s third crew capsule in less than a year.

It’s the biggest crowd up there in more than a decade.

All of the astronauts — representing the U.S., Russia, Japan and France — managed to squeeze into camera view for a congratulatory call from the leaders of their space agencies.

Saturday, April 24, 2021

UK's Johnson faces questions over home refurbishment funding
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson faced questions Saturday over the costly refurbishment of his apartment on London’s Downing Street following a series of incendiary allegations made by his former top adviser.

In a wide-ranging blog post late Friday, Dominic Cummings accused his former boss of attempting an “unethical, foolish, possibly illegal” plan to get Conservative Party donors to fund a lavish refurbishment of the apartment, which he lives in with fiancee Carrie Symonds and their baby son, Wilfred.

Saturday, April 24, 2021

Japan to release Fukushima water in 2 years
Japan's government announced Tuesday it would start releasing treated radioactive water from the wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant into the Pacific Ocean in two years. It's a move that's fiercely opposed by fishermen, residents and Japan's neighbors.

The decision, long speculated at but delayed for years because of safety worries and protests, came during a meeting of Cabinet ministers who endorsed the ocean release as the best option.

Saturday, April 24, 2021

Section of Highway 1 reopens
A section of California’s scenic Highway 1 that collapsed during a winter storm reopened to traffic on Friday.

Gov. Gavin Newsom and work crews stood on the freshly paved and marked roadway to celebrate the reopening of the main artery to and from Big Sur, attracting millions of tourists who visit the famous coastal region each year.

Saturday, April 24, 2021

Scripps National Spelling Bee overhaul
The Scripps National Spelling Bee is undergoing a major overhaul to ensure it can identify a single champion, adding vocabulary questions and a lightning-round tiebreaker to this year’s pandemic-altered competition.

The 96-year-old bee has in the past included vocabulary on written tests but never in the high-stakes oral competition rounds, where one mistake eliminates a speller. The only previous tiebreaker to determine a single champion was a short-lived extra written test that never turned out to be needed.

Friday, April 23, 2021

Leaders tout success at climate summit
World leaders joined President Joe Biden at the virtual climate summit Friday to share their stories how nations can break free of climate-damaging fossil fuels — from Kenyans leapfrogging from kerosene lamps to geothermal power and Israeli start-ups scrambling to improve battery storage.

“We cannot win this fight against climate change unless we go globally to fight it together,” declared President Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta of Kenya.

Friday, April 23, 2021

Airlines await Boeing's word on Max jets
More than 100 new Boeing 737 Max jetliners remain grounded by problems with an electrical issue in some components, and airlines are waiting for Boeing to come up with a plan for repairing the planes.

The Federal Aviation Administration said Thursday that it has notified other aviation regulators and airlines that it is working with Boeing “to fully identify and address” a problem with electrical grounding in a backup power-control unit.

Friday, April 23, 2021

Wisconsin Sen. Johnson questions need for vaccinations
Republican Sen. Ron Johnson, of Wisconsin, questioned the need for widespread COVID-19 vaccinations, saying in a radio interview “what do you care if your neighbor has one or not?”

Johnson, who has no medical expertise or background, made the comments Thursday during an interview with conservative talk radio host Vicki McKenna. Contrary to what medical experts advise, Johnson has said he doesn’t need to be vaccinated because he had COVID-19 in the fall. On Thursday, he went further, questioning why anyone would get vaccinated or worry about why others have not.

Friday, April 23, 2021

Caitlyn Jenner says she will run for governor of California
Republican Caitlyn Jenner said Friday she will run for governor of California, injecting a jolt of celebrity into an emerging campaign that threatens to oust Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom from office.

Jenner — an Olympic hero, reality TV personality and a transgender rights activist — said in statement posted on Twitter and on an accompanying website that she has filed initial paperwork to run for the post.

Friday, April 23, 2021

Proposed New Jersey natural gas pipeline on docket for Supreme Court
On one side of an upcoming Supreme Court case over a proposed natural gas pipeline in New Jersey are two lawyers with more than 250 arguments between them. On the other is Jeremy Feigenbaum, a lawyer for New Jersey who will be making his first Supreme Court appearance.

It may be the greatest numerical mismatch in the history of the high court — a David argues with Goliaths story (although this David comes with millions of dollars a year in earnings potential).

Friday, April 23, 2021

President Biden taps Montana environmentalist as public lands boss
President Joe Biden has nominated a longtime environmental advocate and Democratic aide to oversee the vast expanses of federally owned land in Western states — the latest political appointment raising concerns among Republicans as Biden moves to curtail energy production from public reserves.

Tracy Stone-Manning of Missoula, Montana, was nominated on Thursday to direct the Interior Department’s Bureau of Land Management, which has jurisdiction over about a quarter-billion acres (100 million hectares) and one-third of the nation’s underground minerals, including huge reserves of oil, natural gas and coal. The agency regulates drilling, mining, grazing and other activities and is set to play a key role in  Biden’s commitment announced Thursday to cut climate warming emissions from fossil fuels by half by 2030.

Friday, April 23, 2021

Jill Biden hears from Navajo women
Jill Biden spent the first day of a two-day trip to the Navajo Nation on Thursday hearing from female leaders about the needs and priorities of the country’s largest Native American reservation, including more law enforcement and medical resources.

The trip was Biden’s third to the sprawling reservation — which extends into Arizona, New Mexico and a corner of Utah — and her first as first lady.

Friday, April 23, 2021

Spacex launches third crew for NASA this year; fly on used rocket
SpaceX launched four astronauts into orbit Friday using a recycled rocket and capsule, the third crew flight in less than a year for Elon Musk’s rapidly expanding company.

The astronauts from the U.S., Japan and France should reach the International Space Station early Saturday morning, following a 23-hour ride in the same Dragon capsule used by SpaceX’s debut crew last May. They’ll spend six months at the orbiting lab.

Friday, April 23, 2021

White House wants more vaccinations
The White House is trying to overcome diminishing demand for COVID-19 shots by making it easier for Americans to get vaccinated even as the United States is set to meet President Joe Biden’s goal of administering 200 million coronavirus doses in his first 100 days in office.

With more than 50% of adults at least partially vaccinated and roughly 28 million vaccine doses being delivered each week, demand has eclipsed supply as the constraining factor to vaccinations in much of the country.

Thursday, April 22, 2021

Indonesia looking for submarine that may be too deep to help
Indonesian navy ships searched Thursday for a submarine that likely sank too deep to retrieve, making survival chances for the 53 people on board slim. Authorities said oxygen in the submarine would run out by early Saturday.

The diesel-powered KRI Nanggala 402 was participating in a training exercise Wednesday when it missed a scheduled reporting call. Officials reported an oil slick and the smell of diesel fuel near the starting position of its last dive, about 96 kilometers (60 miles) north of the resort island of Bali, though there was no conclusive evidence that they were linked to the submarine.

Thursday, April 22, 2021

Greta Thunberg docuseries amplifies her climate change fight
Greta Thunberg turned 18 in January, but she’s already made peace with her future: While most college students will change their concentrations multiple times, the Swedish high school student says climate change activism will be her life’s mission.

“In a perfect world, there wouldn’t need to be a climate activist, but unfortunately, there will probably still be a need for climate activists for quite some time,” she said. “I think I will be doing this for as long as there is a need for people to do this.”

Thursday, April 22, 2021

Top-selling bourbon going green
The process of making fine whiskey involves aging spirits to a golden brown, but a bourbon producing giant is going green along the way.

Beam Suntory, producer of top-selling Jim Beam and Maker’s Mark, both crafted in Kentucky, said Wednesday it wants to cut its companywide greenhouse gas emissions and water usage in half by 2030. The company’s more ambitious goal is to remove more carbon than is emitted from its operations and among its supplier base by 2040.

Wednesday, April 21, 2021

Despite growing chorus, Justice Department is limited in police probes
The only way for 13-year-old Adam Toledo to get justice, activists say, is with a federal probe into the Chicago police officer who shot him during a foot chase down a darkened alley.

About a dozen people gathered Tuesday at a legal office in the heart of a Latino neighborhood, near Little Village where the boy was shot last month, to ask the Justice Department to get involved.

“We cannot leave it up to the police department to investigate itself and expect meaningful reforms,” said attorney and activist Arturo Jauregui. “That has never worked in the past and will not work now.”

Wednesday, April 21, 2021

Vladimir Putin warns of 'quick and tough' Russian response for foes
President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday sternly warned the West against encroaching further on Russia’s security interests, saying Moscow’s response will be “quick and tough” and make the culprits feel bitterly sorry for their action.

The warning during Putin’s annual state-of-the-nation address came amid a massive Russian military buildup near Ukraine, where cease-fire violations in the seven-year conflict between Russia-backed separatists and Ukrainian forces have escalated in recent weeks. The United States and its allies have urged the Kremlin to pull the troops back.

Wednesday, April 21, 2021

Wildlife managers set aside land for rare songbird
U.S. wildlife managers have set aside vast areas across several states as habitat critical to the survival of a rare songbird that migrates each year from Central and South America to breeding grounds in Mexico and the United States.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced the final habitat designation for the western yellow-billed cuckoo on Tuesday. It covers about 467 square miles (1,210 square kilometers) along hundreds of miles of rivers and streams in the western states.

Wednesday, April 21, 2021

Bad offshore weather scrubs SpaceX launch
SpaceX on Wednesday bumped its next astronaut launch by a day because of dangerously high waves and wind offshore.

Liftoff is now scheduled an hour before sunrise Friday from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, when better weather is expected.

Wednesday, April 21, 2021

Jury's verdict for Chauvin in Floyd death: Guilty
After three weeks of testimony, the trial of the former police officer charged with killing George Floyd ended swiftly: barely over a day of jury deliberations, then just minutes for the verdicts to be read — guilty, guilty and guilty — and Derek Chauvin was handcuffed and taken away to prison.

Chauvin, 45, could be sent to prison for decades when he is sentenced in about two months in a case that triggered worldwide protests, violence and a furious reexamination of racism and policing in the U.S.

Wednesday, April 21, 2021

Signs of progress in Iran nuclear deal
Diplomats working in Vienna on a solution to bringing the United States back into the nuclear deal with Iran and world powers are taking a break from talks to consult with their leaders amid continued signs of progress, Russia’s delegate said Tuesday.

Mikhail Ulyanov said after a meeting of the deal’s so-called Joint Commission of senior officials with representatives from France, Germany, Britain, China and Iran that they had noted “with satisfaction of the progress in negotiations to restore the nuclear deal.“

“It was decided to take a break to allow the delegations to do homework and consult with the capitals,” he tweeted. “The Commission will meet again early next week.”

Tuesday, April 20, 2021

First lady Biden talks higher education
First lady Jill Biden and U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona visited Sauk Valley Community College in Dixon on Monday to discuss how the American Rescue Plan will support higher education in Illinois.

After touring the facility, Cardona and the first lady announced President Joe Biden’s investment in higher education through the American Rescue Plan, the latest federal COVID-19 pandemic relief package, which includes $40 billion for higher education infrastructure projects and programs to make education more accessible.

Tuesday, April 20, 2021

US takes steps to protect electric system from cyberattacks
The Biden administration is taking steps to protect the country’s electric system from cyberattacks through a new 100-day initiative combining federal government agencies and private industry.
Tuesday, April 20, 2021

Feds consider how to respond after verdict in Chauvin trial
The Biden administration is privately weighing how to handle the upcoming verdict in the trial of former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin, including considering whether President Joe Biden should address the nation and dispatching specially trained community facilitators from the Justice Department, aides and officials told The Associated Press.

The jury resumed deliberations Tuesday morning after spending a few hours Monday discussing the case behind closed doors. In closing arguments earlier in the day, a prosecutor told jurors that Chauvin “had to know” he was squeezing the life out of George Floyd as he cried over and over that he couldn’t breathe and finally fell silent. Chauvin faces murder and manslaughter charges.

The plans for possible presidential remarks are still fluid, with the timing, venue and nature of the remarks still being considered, in part depending on the timing of the verdict, according to two White House aides who were not authorized to speak publicly about private conversations and spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity.

Tuesday, April 20, 2021

Restaurants, deliver apps still at odds as demand grows
Diners got used to delivery during the pandemic, and the habit may stick long after dining rooms reopen. But restaurants and delivery companies remain uneasy partners, haggling over fees and struggling to make the service profitable for themselves and each other.

Companies like DoorDash and UberEats helped many restaurants stay in business during lockdowns, allowing diners to stay in and still order out. But that convenience came at a price: Delivery companies can charge commission fees of 30% or more per order, hurting restaurants’ already meager profits.

Tuesday, April 20, 2021

Miners' union backs shift from coal in exchange for more jobs
The nation’s largest coal miners’ union said Monday it would accept President Joe Biden’s plan to move away from coal and other fossil fuels in exchange for a “true energy transition“ that includes thousands of jobs in renewable energy and spending on technology to make coal cleaner.

Cecil Roberts, president of the United Mine Workers of America, said ensuring jobs for displaced miners — including 7,000 coal workers who lost their jobs last year — is crucial to any infrastructure bill taken up by Congress.

Tuesday, April 20, 2021

Should states set pot policy by its potency? Some say yes
As marijuana legalization spreads across U.S. states, so does a debate over whether to set pot policy by potency.

Under a law signed last month, New York will tax recreational marijuana based on its amount of THC, the main intoxicating chemical in cannabis. Illinois imposed a potency-related tax when recreational pot sales began  last year. Vermont is limiting THC content when its legal market opens  as soon as next year, and limits or taxes have been broached in some other states and the U.S. Senate’s drug-control caucus.

Supporters say such measures will protect public health by roping off, or at least discouraging, what they view as dangerously concentrated cannabis.

Tuesday, April 20, 2021

Search for survivors of capsized lift boat in Gulf of Mexico ends
The search for survivors from a capsized lift boat in the Gulf of Mexico has closed and attention now turns to comforting the loved ones of the five known dead and eight missing, a grim hunt for bodies and a painstaking investigation that could take up to two years.

Seven days after the Seacor Power capsized in rough waters on April 12 while it was traveling about eight miles off the Louisiana coast, the Coast Guard on Monday suspended the search and rescue operation for the eight people still missing from the vessel. All told, the searched had covered 9,000 square miles (23,000 square kilometers) of waters off Louisiana.

Tuesday, April 20, 2021

President Biden's virtual climate change summit: Diplomacy by Zoom without human touch
There will be no hands to shake or backs to slap, no way to look a foreign leader in the eye. The small human moments that define statecraft will be reduced to images on a screen.

President Joe Biden, a most hands-on politician, this week will host a major climate summit with dozens of world leaders — all of them stuck on Zoom.

Tuesday, April 20, 2021

Supreme Court rejects lingering 2020 election challenge case
The Supreme Court on Monday said it will not hear a case out of Pennsylvania related to the 2020 election, a case that had lingered while similar election challenges had already been rejected by the justices.

The high court directed a lower court to dismiss the case as moot.

Monday, April 19, 2021

Biden feels heat on emissions goal
As President Joe Biden convenes a virtual climate summit on Thursday with 40 world leaders, he faces a vexing task: how to put forward a nonbinding but symbolic goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that will have a tangible impact on climate change efforts not only in the U.S. but throughout the world.

The emissions target, eagerly awaited by all sides of the climate debate, will signal how aggressively Biden wants to move on climate change, a divisive and expensive issue that has riled Republicans to complain about job-killing government overreach even as some on the left worry Biden has not gone far enough to address a profound threat to the planet.

Monday, April 19, 2021

Billions spent on coronavirus fight, what's next
Congress has poured tens of billions of dollars into state and local public health departments in response to the coronavirus pandemic, paying for masks, contact tracers and education campaigns to persuade people to get vaccinated.

Public health officials who have juggled bare-bones budgets for years are happy to have the additional money. Yet they worry it will soon dry up as the pandemic recedes, continuing a boom-bust funding cycle that has plagued the U.S. public health system for decades. If budgets are slashed again, they warn, that could leave the nation where it was before the coronavirus: unprepared for a health crisis.

“We need funds that we can depend on year after year,” said Dr. Mysheika Roberts, the health commissioner of Columbus, Ohio.

Monday, April 19, 2021

Delegate: Progress in Iran nuclear talks but end 'far away'
High-level talks in Vienna aimed at bringing the United States back into the 2015 nuclear deal with Iran are moving ahead with experts working on drafting proposals this week, but a solution remains “far away,” Russia’s delegate said Monday.

The U.S. unilaterally left the agreement, which promises Iran economic incentives in return for curbs on its nuclear program, in 2018 under then President Donald Trump, who said it needed to be renegotiated and imposed crippling sanctions.

Monday, April 19, 2021

2 dead, 2 wounded in Wis. shooting
Three people were killed and two were seriously wounded in a shooting at a busy tavern in southeastern Wisconsin early Sunday, sheriff’s officials said.

Kenosha County Sheriff David Beth said the suspect in the shooting at Somers House Tavern in Kenosha County is still at large, but that he believes the public is not in danger.

Monday, April 19, 2021

FedEx shooter leagally bought guns used in shooting
The former employee who shot and killed eight people at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis legally bought the two rifles used in the attack despite red flag laws designed to prevent such purchases, police said.

A trace of the two guns found by investigators at the scene revealed that suspect Brandon Scott Hole, 19, of Indianapolis, legally bought the rifles last July and September, officials with the Indianapolis police said Saturday.

Monday, April 19, 2021

Organizers of a $20 million contest to develop products from greenhouse gas that flows from power plants announced two winners Monday ahead of launching a similar but much bigger competition backed by Elon Musk.

Both winners made concrete that trapped carbon dioxide, keeping it out of the atmosphere, where it can contribute to climate change. Production of cement, concrete’s key ingredient, accounts for 7% of global emissions of the greenhouse gas, said Marcius Extavour, XPRIZE vice president of climate and energy.

Monday, April 19, 2021

US West prepares for possible water shortage
CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) — The man-made lakes that store water supplying millions of people in the U.S. West and Mexico are projected to shrink to historic lows in the coming months, dropping to levels that could trigger the federal government’s first-ever official shortage declaration and prompt cuts in Arizona and Nevada.
Saturday, April 17, 2021

As mask mandates end, Oregon bucks the trend
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — As states around the country lift COVID-19 restrictions, Oregon is poised to go the opposite direction — and many residents are fuming about it.
Saturday, April 17, 2021

Four Sikhs among victims of Indy mass shooting
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indianapolis’ tight knit Sikh community mourned Saturday as members learned that four Sikhs were among the eight people killed in the mass shooting at a FedEx warehouse.
Saturday, April 17, 2021

Two sue United Airlines over engine explosion
DENVER (AP) — Two passengers who were aboard a United Airlines flight that had to make an emergency landing after one of its engines blew apart and sent debris raining down on Colorado neighborhoods sued the company Friday.
Saturday, April 17, 2021

Prince Philip laid to rest as somber queen sits alone
WINDSOR, England (AP) — As military bands played and a procession of royals escorted his coffin to the church, Prince Philip was laid to rest Saturday in a funeral ceremony that honored his lifetime of service to the U.K., the crown and his wife of 73 years, Queen Elizabeth II.
Saturday, April 17, 2021

Vrana scores in Detroit debut, Red Wings beat Chicago 4-1
DETROIT (AP) — Jakub Vrana scored in his Detroit debut, and Troy Stecher added two goals for the Red Wings in a 4-1 victory over the Chicago Blackhawks on Thursday night.
Saturday, April 17, 2021

Head of Tokyo Olympics again says games will not be canceled
TOKYO (AP) — The head of the Tokyo Olympics on Friday was again forced to assure the world that the postponed games will open in just over three months and not be canceled despite surging COVID-19 cases in Japan.
Saturday, April 17, 2021

51 West Point cadets caught cheating; must repeat year
Most of the 73 West Point cadets accused in the biggest cheating scandal in decades at the U.S. Military Academy are being required to repeat a year, and eight were expelled, academy officials said Friday.
Friday, April 16, 2021

Beijing says US 'too negative' toward China
BEIJING (AP) — A top Chinese diplomat said Friday that U.S. policy toward China is “too negative“ and that cooperation could be critically important as the Biden administration focuses on combatting COVID-19 and promoting economic recovery.
Friday, April 16, 2021

Pandemic has upended Oscars; Producer says changes are coming for this year's show
NEW YORK (AP) — Ninety seconds. That’s how quickly Steven Soderbergh believes the Academy Awards will convince viewers that this year’s telecast is different.
Friday, April 16, 2021

Police try to identify gunman, motive in FedEx shooting
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Police were working Friday to identify a gunman and determine his motive for opening fire at a FedEx facility near the Indianapolis airport, killing eight people and taking his own life in the latest mass shooting to rock the U.S.
Friday, April 16, 2021

Nat'l network will track virus variants
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. is setting up a $1.7 billion national network to identify and track worrisome coronavirus mutations whose spread could trigger another pandemic wave, the Biden administration announced today.
Friday, April 16, 2021

Shy podcaster helps California police solve cold case
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Chris Lambert would like to get back to making music but he can’t seem to stop chasing a ghost that has haunted him for nearly 25 years.
Friday, April 16, 2021

Kosovo doctors protest arrest
PRISTINA, Kosovo (AP) — Kosovar doctors on Friday threatened to take action in support of a colleague who was arrested for refusing to treat a patient after working hours.
Friday, April 16, 2021

Coast Guard divers hope to reach 12 missing workers
PORT FOURCHON, La. (AP) — Divers searching for oil industry workers on a capsized liftboat prepared to enter the overturned vessel on Friday, a rescue effort complicated by daunting technical challenges and continued bad weather.
Friday, April 16, 2021

Charmed by Bernie Madoff, SEC later tightened its rules
WASHINGTON (AP) — Until Bernie Madoff’s scheme came crashing down and the biggest Ponzi scheme in Wall Street’s history came to light, he appeared as a charming wizard with a Midas touch. His investment advisory business attracted a devoted legion of clients, including A-list celebrities, rewarding them with steady returns that defied market fluctuations.
Friday, April 16, 2021

Europe has surpassed 1 million COVID-19 deaths
A top official from the World Health Organization says Europe has surpassed 1 million deaths from COVID-19 and the situation remains "serious," with about 1.6 million new cases reported each week in the region.

The comments by Dr. Hans Kluge on Thursday aimed to emphasize that Europe must keep up its guard with social distancing and speed up vaccinations as virus variants drive new infections to record levels in some nations.

Thursday, April 15, 2021

Google Earth adds time lapse video, shows climate change
The Google Earth app is adding a new video feature that draws upon nearly four decades of satellite imagery to vividly illustrate how climate change has affected glaciers, beaches, forests and other places around the world.

The tool unveiled Thursday is rolling out in what is being billed as the biggest update to Google Earth in five years. Google says it undertook the complex project in partnership with several government agencies, including NASA in the U.S. and its European counterpart, in hopes that it will help a mass audience grasp the sometimes abstract concept of climate change in more tangible terms through its free Earth app.

Thursday, April 15, 2021

US jobless claims plunge to 576,000, lowest since pandemic
The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits tumbled last week to 576,000, a post-COVID low and a hopeful sign that layoffs are easing as the economy recovers from the pandemic recession.

The Labor Department said Thursday that applications plummeted by 193,000 from a revised 769,000 a week earlier. Jobless claims are now down sharply from a peak of 900,000 in early January and well below the 700,000-plus level they had been stuck at for months.

Thursday, April 15, 2021

US imposes new sanctions on Russia
The Biden administration on Thursday announced the expulsion of 10 Russian diplomats and sanctions against dozens of people and companies as it moved to hold the Kremlin accountable for interference in last year’s presidential election and the hacking of federal agencies.

The sanctions also target Moscow’s ability to borrow money by prohibiting U.S. financial institutions from buying Russian bonds directly from Russian institutions.

Thursday, April 15, 2021

Biden's gamble; Will pulling troops revive extremist threat in Afghanistan?
At its start, America’s war in Afghanistan was about retribution for 9/11. Then it was about shoring up a weak government and its weak army so that Osama bin Laden’s al-Qaida could never again threaten the United States.

Now it’s about over. With bin Laden long since dead and the United States not suffering another major attack, President Joe Biden is promising to end America’s longest war and move on to what he believes are bigger, more consequential challenges posed by a resurgent Russia and a rising China.

Thursday, April 15, 2021

President faces long odds in push for more 'red flag' laws
President Joe Biden faces an uphill battle as he tries to revive a push for more state laws that would allow authorities to temporarily disarm people who are considered a danger to themselves or others.

The political circumstances surrounding this year’s effort are drastically different than they were three years ago, when state lawmakers, governors of both parties and former President Donald Trump embraced the extreme-risk protection orders after the 2018 mass shooting that killed 17 people at a high school in Parkland, Florida.

Wednesday, April 14, 2021

No charges for officer in Capitol riot shooting
Federal prosecutors will not charge a police officer who shot and killed a woman as she climbed through the broken part of a door during the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6.

Authorities had considered for months whether criminal charges were appropriate for the Capitol Police officer who fatally shot Ashli Babbitt, 35, an Air Force veteran from San Diego. The Justice Department’s decision, though expected, officially closes out the investigation.

Wednesday, April 14, 2021

Biden: Forces shouldn't be in Afghanistan
President Joe Biden  announced his plans to withdraw remaining U.S. troops from Afghanistan, declaring that the Sept. 11 attacks “cannot explain” why American forces should still be there 20 years after the deadliest terror assault on the United States.

His plan is to pull out all the American forces — numbering 2,500 now — by this Sept. 11, according to U.S. officials. That is the anniversary of the attacks, which were coordinated from Afghanistan.

Wednesday, April 14, 2021

Expert blames Floyd death on heart rhythm problem
George Floyd died of a sudden heart rhythm problem due to his heart disease while being restrained by police, a retired forensic pathologist testified for the defense Wednesday at former Officer Derek Chauvin’s murder trial, contradicting several experts who said Floyd succumbed to a lack of oxygen.

Dr. David Fowler, a former chief medical examiner for the state of Maryland and now a member of a consulting firm, said the fentanyl and methamphetamine in Floyd’s system, and possible carbon monoxide poisoning from auto exhaust, were contributing factors. He said Floyd’s heart disease included high blood pressure and narrowing of the arteries.

Wednesday, April 14, 2021

State sued over veteran's COVID-19 death
A wrongful death lawsuit on behalf of a Korean War veteran who contracted COVID-19 at the LaSalle Veterans’ Home accuses the facility of negligent care that violated state law.

Richard John Cieski Sr. was one of 36 veterans who died last year during the COVID-19 outbreak at the LaSalle home that began in November.

Wednesday, April 14, 2021

Digital currency exchange Coinbase goes public
Wall Streeet was focused on Coinbase today with the digital currency exchange becoming a publicly traded company.

Coinbase made its initial public offering of stock with cryptocurrency chatter seemingly everywhere, even at the U.S. Federal Reserve. It is being incorporated into the business plans and accepted by major corporations like Tesla, PayPal and Visa.

Wednesday, April 14, 2021

Edmunds: How to test-drive latest vehicle technology
New vehicles are brimming with technology that can enhance convenience, connectivity and driver safety. But the tech can also be unfamiliar to car shoppers, especially those who haven’t purchased a vehicle in the past five years or more. This poses a problem when it comes to the traditional test drive.

It’s one thing to evaluate familiar vehicle attributes such as acceleration or seat comfort. But how can you evaluate these new gadgets in the typical 15- to 20-minute test drive if you don’t quite know what they do or what to look for?

Wednesday, April 14, 2021

Ponzi schemer Bernie Madoff dies in federal prison
Bernie Madoff, the financier who pleaded guilty to orchestrating a massive Ponzi scheme, died in a federal prison early Wednesday, a person familiar with the matter told The Associated Press.

Madoff died at the Federal Medical Center in Butner, North Carolina, apparently from natural causes, the person said. The person was not authorized to speak publicly and spoke to the AP on the condition of anonymity.

Wednesday, April 14, 2021

US recommends pause for J&J vaccine
The U.S. is recommending a “pause” in using the single-dose Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine to investigate reports of potentially dangerous blood clots.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration said today they were investigating unusual clots that occurred 6 to 13 days after vaccination. The clots occurred in veins that drain blood from the brain and occurred together with low platelets. All six cases were in women between the ages of 18 and 48; there was one death and all remained under investigation.

Tuesday, April 13, 2021

15% of Americans worse off a year into pandemic
While most Americans have weathered the pandemic financially, about 38 million say they are worse off now than before the outbreak began in the U.S.

Overall, 55% of Americans say their financial circumstances are about the same now as a year ago, and 30% say their finances have improved, according to a new poll from Impact Genome and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. But 15% say they are worse off.

Tuesday, April 13, 2021

US budget deficit jumps to record $1.7 trillion
The U.S. government’s budget deficit surged to an all-time high of $1.7 trillion for the first six months of this budget year, nearly double the previous record, as another round of economic-support checks added billions of dollars to spending last month.

In its monthly budget report, the Treasury Department said Monday that the deficit for the first half of the budget year — from October through March — was up from a shortfall of $743.5 billion in the same period a year ago.

Tuesday, April 13, 2021

Migrants: Mexico, Central America deploy troops
The Biden administration has struck an agreement with Mexico, Honduras and Guatemala to temporarily surge security forces to their borders in an effort to reduce the tide of migration to the U.S. border.

The agreement comes as the U.S. saw a record number of unaccompanied children attempting to cross the border in March, and the largest number of Border Patrol encounters overall with migrants on the southern border — just under 170,000 — since March 2001.

Tuesday, April 13, 2021

Unusual treatment shows promise for kids with brain tumors
For decades, a deadly type of childhood cancer has eluded science’s best tools. Now doctors have made progress with an unusual treatment: Dripping millions of copies of a virus directly into kids’ brains to infect their tumors and spur an immune system attack.

A dozen children treated this way lived more than twice as long as similar patients have in the past, doctors reported Saturday at an American Association for Cancer Research conference and in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Tuesday, April 13, 2021

William, Harry remember Prince Phillip's wit
Princes William and Harry paid tribute Monday to their grandfather, Prince Philip, remembering his wit, sense of duty and barbecue skills.

The brothers, who are at the center of a royal family rift, issued separate statements about Philip, who died last week at 99.

Monday, April 12, 2021

Biden dog to get professional help adjusting to White House
President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden’s dog Major will get professional help adjusting to the White House after a pair of biting incidents last month.

Private training for the 3-year-old German shepherd will be “off-site” in the Washington area, Michael LaRosa, a spokesperson for Jill Biden, said Monday in an emailed statement. The training is expected to last a few weeks, he said.

Monday, April 12, 2021

Outdoor enthusiasts to get cash, free passes to move to West Va.
West Virginia is joining the growing list of places recruiting remote workers — with a thrill-seeking twist.

A public-private program launched Monday will try to lure outdoor enthusiasts to live in the rural state with enticements of cash and free passes for recreational destinations. The goal is to leverage one of West Virginia’s most appealing assets, its epic natural beauty, to stem the tide of population loss in the only state that has fewer residents now than in 1950.

Monday, April 12, 2021

Death in Minnesota traffic stop sparks more unrest
A Black man died after being shot by police in a Minneapolis suburb during a traffic stop and crashing his car several blocks away, sparking violent protests that lasted into the early hours Monday as officers in riot gear clashed with demonstrators and the man’s mother called for calm.

The man was identified by family as 20-year-old Daunte Wright, and he died Sunday in a metropolitan area already on edge and midway through the trial of the first of four police officers charged in George Floyd’s death. Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz tweeted he was praying for Wright’s family “as our state mourns another life of a Black man taken by law enforcement.”

Monday, April 12, 2021

Report issues infrastructure grades
The Biden White House is amplifying the push for its $2.3 trillion infrastructure package with the release of state-by-state breakdowns that show the dire shape of roads, bridges, the power grid and housing affordability.

The figures in the state summaries, obtained by The Associated Press, paint a decidedly bleak outlook for the world’s largest economy after years of repairs being deferred and delayed. They suggest that too much infrastructure is unsafe for vehicles at any speed, while highlighting the costs of extreme weather events that have become more frequent with climate change as well as dead spots for broadband and a dearth of child care options.

Monday, April 12, 2021

Record demand at Uber as vaccinations rise
Uber is offering sign-up bonuses and other incentives for drivers as it faces record demand for rides and meal delivery.

The San Francisco ride-hailing company said Monday that total monthly bookings, including food delivery and passenger service, reached an all-time high in March.

In a government filing, the company said demand for ride-hailing, which plunged during coronavirus lockdowns last year, has recovered more quickly than expected as daily COVID-19 vaccinations exceed 3 million per day in the U.S.

Monday, April 12, 2021

Duke Energy division planning $180M Indiana solar farm
A division of Duke Energy that develops renewable energy projects plans to build a $180 million solar farm in western Indiana that would produce enough electricity to power 35,000 homes.
Saturday, April 10, 2021

US to keep migrant families in hotels
Migrant families will be held at hotels in the Phoenix area in response to a growing number of people crossing the U.S.-Mexico border, authorities said Friday, another step in the Biden administration’s rush to set up temporary space for them.

U.S. Sen. Kyrsten Sinema was told that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement will occupy “several hotels along the southwest border, including in Chandler and Phoenix,” her office said in a statement. Chandler is a Phoenix suburb that’s more than 150 miles (241 kilometers) north of the border.

Saturday, April 10, 2021

Senate filibuster's racist past fuels arguments
Once obscure, the Senate filibuster is coming under fresh scrutiny not only because of the enormous power it gives a single senator to halt President Joe Biden’s agenda, but as a tool historically used for racism.

Senators and those advocating for changes to the practice say the procedure that allows endless debate is hardly what the founders intended, but rather a Jim Crow-relic whose time is up. Among the most vivid examples, they point to landmark filibusters including Strom Thurmond’s 24-hour speech against a 1957 Civil Rights bill, as ways it has been used to stall changes.

Saturday, April 10, 2021

Reforms follow deadly year in New York nursing homes
After a deadly year in New York’s nursing homes, state lawmakers have passed legislation intended to hold facility operators more accountable for neglect and potentially force them to spend more on patient care.
Saturday, April 10, 2021

Apartment of Russian investigative journalist raided
Russian authorities took a prominent investigative journalist in for questioning after searching his apartment, and the news website he works for said the actions were likely connected to a story about one of President Vladimir Putin’s closest associates.
Saturday, April 10, 2021

After Amazon: Labor tries to regroup in wake of Alabama loss
Despite the strongest public support and the most sympathetic president in years, the American labor movement just suffered a stinging defeat — again.

Amazon warehouse workers in Bessemer, Alabama, overwhelmingly voted against joining the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union in much-anticipated election results announced Friday.

Saturday, April 10, 2021

Democrats trying to pass first major gun control in 2 decades
Democrats in Congress are trying to pass the first major gun control legislation in more than two decades with the support of President Joe Biden, who said Thursday that it is “long past time” to do so. But they are confronting a potentially insurmountable question over what rules should govern private sales and transfers, including those between friends and extended family, as they seek Republican votes.
Friday, April 9, 2021

Michigan COVID transmission worst in nation
Washington is surging federal resources to support vaccinations, testing and therapeutics, but not vaccines, to Michigan in an effort to control the state’s worst-in-the-nation COVID-19 transmission rate, the White House said Friday.

President Joe Biden outlined the moves late Thursday in a call with Gov. Gretchen Whitmer to discuss the situation in the state, according to senior administration officials. It will not include a “surge” of vaccine doses, a move Whitmer has advocated.

Friday, April 9, 2021

Amazon appears to have enough votes to block union effort
Amazon appears to have enough votes to block a union effort at a warehouse in Bessemer, Alabama, proving the might of the online shopping giant and cutting off a path that labor activists had hoped would lead to similar efforts throughout the company and beyond.

The company crossed the threshold to secure a majority of votes, with 1,798 warehouse workers rejecting the union and 738 voting in favor.

Friday, April 9, 2021

Biden's $1.5 trillion wish list
President Joe Biden released a $1.5 trillion wish list for the federal budget today, asking for an 8.4% increase in agency operating budgets with substantial gains for Democratic priorities like education, health care, housing and environmental protection.
Friday, April 9, 2021

Rep. Gaetz hires New York lawyer
Rep. Matt Gaetz is retaining two prominent New York attorneys as he faces a Justice Department investigation into sex trafficking allegations involving underage girls.

Marc Mukasey and Isabelle Kirshner will lead the Florida Republican’s legal team, a Gaetz spokesperson said in a statement Friday.

Friday, April 9, 2021

Wisconsin Supreme Court won't purge voters
The Wisconsin Supreme Court sided with Democrats on Friday and ruled that the state elections commission should not remove from the rolls voters flagged as possibly having moved, something conservatives have wanted done for nearly two years.

The court’s 5-2 ruling means about  69,000 people on the list of likely movers  will not have their voter registrations deactivated. When the lawsuit was first brought in 2019, about 234,000 were on the list. Of those who remain, none voted in the 2020 presidential election, according to the Wisconsin Elections Commission. No voters had their registrations deactivated while the legal fight was pending.

Friday, April 9, 2021

Biden's expansion of long-term care sparks debate
President Joe Biden is proposing a major expansion of the government’s role in long-term care, but questions are being raised over his using the low-income Medicaid program and piggybacking the whole idea on an infrastructure bill.

The White House infrastructure package includes $400 billion to accelerate a shift from institutional care to home and community services through the federal-state Medicaid program. The size of the financial commitment — about 17% of the $2.3 trillion infrastructure proposal — leaves no doubt that Biden intends to put his mark on long-term care.

Friday, April 9, 2021

Prince Phillip, longest serving royal consort, dies
Prince Philip, the irascible and tough-minded husband of Queen Elizabeth II who spent more than seven decades supporting his wife in a role that both defined and constricted his life, has died, Buckingham Palace said Friday. He was 99.

His life spanned nearly a century of European history, starting with his birth as a member of the Greek royal family and ending as Britain’s longest serving consort during a turbulent reign in which the thousand-year-old monarchy was forced to reinvent itself for the 21st century.

Friday, April 9, 2021

Number of kids alone at border hits all-time high
The U.S. government picked up nearly 19,000 children traveling alone across the Mexican border in March, authorities said Thursday, the largest monthly number ever recorded and a major test for President Joe Biden as he reverses many of his predecessor’s hardline immigration tactics.

A complex mix of factors in the United States and Central America drove the increase.  It has coincided with the Biden administration’s decision to exempt unaccompanied children from pandemic-related powers to immediately expel most people from the country without giving them an opportunity to seek asylum. Children are instead released to “sponsors” in the U.S., usually parents or close relatives, while being allowed to pursue their cases in heavily backlogged immigration courts.

Thursday, April 8, 2021

A city wrestled down an addiction crisis, then came COVID
Larrecsa Cox steered past the used tire shop, where a young man had collapsed a few days before, the syringe he’d used to shoot heroin still clenched in his fist.

She wound toward his house in the hills outside of town. The man had been revived by paramedics, and Cox leads a team with a mission of finding every overdose survivor to save them from the next one.

Thursday, April 8, 2021

Georgia lawmaker will not face protest charges
A district attorney in Atlanta said Wednesday that she will not pursue charges against a Georgia state lawmaker who was arrested during a protest of the state’s sweeping new election law.

“After reviewing all of the evidence, I have decided to close this matter,” Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis said in an emailed statement. “It will not be presented to a grand jury for consideration of indictment, and it is now closed.”

Wednesday, April 7, 2021

Biden proposes pitch for higher business taxes
The Biden administration is drilling down on the argument that higher corporate tax rates would ultimately help an ailing economy, saying the resulting infrastructure investments would boost growth.

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said Wednesday it was “self-defeating” for then-President Donald Trump to assume that cutting the corporate tax rate to 21% from 35% in 2017 would make the economy more competitive and unleash growth. Yellen said that competing on tax rates came at the expense of investing in workers.

Wednesday, April 7, 2021

156 million coronavirus relief payments issued
The Treasury Department said Wednesday it has issued more than 156 million payments as part of President Joe Biden’s coronavirus relief plan, including 25 million payments that were primarily to Social Security beneficiaries who hadn’t filed 2019 or 2020 tax returns.

The direct payments of as much as $1,400 per person were the cornerstone promise of Biden’s $1.9 trillion package to contain the pandemic and revive the U.S. economy. Roughly $372 billion has been paid out since March 12, a sum that likely boosted hiring last month as Americans had more money to spend.

Wednesday, April 7, 2021

Lawmakers call YouTube Kids a vapid wasteland
A House subcommittee is investigating YouTube Kids, saying the Google-owned video service feeds children inappropriate material in “a wasteland of vapid, consumerist content“ so it can serve them ads.

The inquiry comes despite  Google agreeing to pay $170 million in 2019 to settle allegations that YouTube collected personal data on children without their parents’ consent.

Wednesday, April 7, 2021

Discarded masks litter beaches, threaten sea life
To the usual list of foul trash left behind or washed up on beaches around the world, add these: masks and gloves used by people to avoid the coronavirus and then discarded on the sand.

In the past year, volunteers picking up trash on beaches from the Jersey Shore to California, the United Kingdom and Hong Kong have been finding discarded personal protective equipment.

Wednesday, April 7, 2021

Highest job openings rate on record
The pace of job openings reached the highest level on record in February, a harbinger of healthy hiring and a hopeful sign for those looking for work.

The job openings rate — which is the number of available jobs as a percentage of the employed and the open jobs, combined — rose to 4.9%, the highest since the data was first tracked in December 2000, the Labor Department said Tuesday.

Tuesday, April 6, 2021

Farmers file antitrust lawsuit against big ag companies
A group of farmers has filed an antitrust case against several big agricultural companies, contending the companies worked together to ban e-commerce sales in order to keep prices artificially high.

The farmers are seeking class-action status and they want a judge to force the companies to give up “unlawful profits” and pay compensation to those impacted by the high prices.

Tuesday, April 6, 2021

FDA OKs first new ADHD drug in over a decade
U.S. regulators have approved the first new drug in over a decade for children with ADHD, which causes inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity.

The Food and Drug Administration late Friday OK’d Qelbree (KELL’-bree) for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children ages 6 to 17. It comes as a capsule that’s taken daily.

Tuesday, April 6, 2021

Woman recovering after rare windpipe transplant from donor
Sonia Sein said she spent the last six years “trying to catch every breath at every moment“ after extensive treatment for her severe asthma damaged her windpipe.

She is breathing freely again after getting an unusual transplant. In January, doctors at New York’s Mount Sinai replaced her trachea, the tube that ferries air from the mouth to the lungs.

Tuesday, April 6, 2021

Twitter slowdown in Russia until mid-May; no block for now
Russian authorities said Monday they would continue to slow down Twitter until mid-May, but wouldn’t block the social media platform for now because it has started to remove banned content faster.

The announcement marks somewhat of a reprieve in the recent standoff between the Russian government and the platform, which has played a role in amplifying dissent in Russia.

Monday, April 5, 2021

High court sides with Google in copyright fight with Oracle
The Supreme Court sided Monday with Google in an $8 billion copyright dispute with Oracle over the internet company’s creation of the Android operating system used on most smartphones worldwide.
Monday, April 5, 2021

No indication officer in Capitol attack was stabbed, shot
A Capitol Police officer killed last week when a man armed with a knife rammed his car into two officers at a barricade outside the Capitol does not appear to have been stabbed, slashed or shot, a police official told The Associated Press on Monday.

Officer William “Billy” Evans, an 18-year veteran of the force, died Friday after the driver rammed into the barricade near the Capitol. The driver, identified as 25-year-old Noah Green, crashed into the officers and the barrier, then exited the car armed with a knife and lunged at the officers before police fatally shot him, authorities said.

Monday, April 5, 2021

Yellen calls for minimum global corporate income tax
U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen on Monday urged the adoption of a minimum global corporate income tax, an effort to offset any disadvantages that might arise from the Biden administration’s proposed increase in the U.S. corporate tax rate.

Citing a “thirty-year race to the bottom” in which countries have slashed corporate tax rates in an effort to attract multinational businesses, Yellen said the Biden administration would work with other advanced economies in the Group of 20 to set a minimum.

Monday, April 5, 2021

Border woes dent Biden approval on immigration
More Americans disapprove than approve of how President Joe Biden is handling the sharply increasing number of unaccompanied migrant children arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border, and approval of his efforts on larger immigration policy falls short of other top issues — suggesting it could be a weak point for the new administration.

A new poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research also shows that solving the problem of young people at the border is among Americans' highest immigration priorities: 59% say providing safe treatment of unaccompanied children when they are apprehended should be a high priority, and 65% say the same about reuniting families separated at the border.

Monday, April 5, 2021

Some businesses want masks on, even as states drop mandates
Although Texas no longer requires people to wear masks to protect against COVID-19, customers do need them to enter De J. Lozada’s store.

“We cannot afford to take chances with the lives of my staffers. They’re young people and their parents have entrusted me with their care,” says Lozada, owner of Soul Popped Gourmet Popcorn, a shop located in Austin’s Barton Creek Square Mall.

Monday, April 5, 2021

GameStop to sell 3.5M shares after stock frenzy
Two months after a market phenomenon took shares of GameStop to the moon, the video game retailer said Monday that it will sell up to 3.5 million of its shares.

The shares will be sold through an “at-the-market” offering, which lets companies place their stock on the market over a period of time.

Monday, April 5, 2021

Wildfire in Theodore Roosevelt National Park triples in size
Firefighters worked Monday to further contain a wildfire in Theodore Roosevelt National Park that tripled in size on Easter, according to the North Dakota Forest Service.

Crews worked through the night in the park’s North Unit, where the fire threatens some park staff housing, maintenance buildings and the CCC Campground, according to the Forest Service’s acting outreach and education manager, Beth Hill.

Monday, April 5, 2021

Israel's Netanyahu sees prospects fade as his trial resumes
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s corruption trial resumed Monday, with a key witness painting a picture of an image-obsessed Israeli leader forcing a prominent news site to flatter his family and smear his opponents.

The testimony came as Netanyahu’s chances of securing another term in office following last month’s parliamentary elections appeared to be dwindling in high-stakes political talks hosted by the country’s figurehead president just a few miles (kilometers) away.

Monday, April 5, 2021

New to DC, Buttigieg looks to build bridges with Biden plan
Pete Buttigieg was a few weeks into his job as transportation secretary, buried in meetings and preparing for the launch of President Joe Biden’s $2.3 trillion public works plan, when evening arrived along with a time to try something new in Washington.

Instead of climbing into the back seat of a black SUV like most Cabinet secretaries, he headed to a bike-share rack. Helmet on, and with a couple of Secret Service agents flanking him, he pedaled the mile-long trip to his home in the Capitol Hill neighborhood.

Monday, April 5, 2021

Rescue hampered by distance as more rain falls in Indonesia
Rescuers were hampered by damaged bridges and roads and a lack of heavy equipment Monday after torrential rains caused multiple disasters on remote eastern Indonesian islands.

At least 55 people have died and more than 40 are missing in Indonesia, and the tropical cyclone causing the damage is expected to continue affecting Indonesia and East Timor for days and later Australia.

Monday, April 5, 2021

Taiwan investigators ask public for photos of train wreck
Prosecutors investigating Taiwan’s worst railway disaster in seven decades appealed to the public Monday for any photographs they may have taken of the crash that killed at least 50 people last week.

Hualien County Prosecutor Yu Hsiu-tuan said people may have inadvertently gathered evidence in their photos, particularly about individuals observing the crash scene from a construction site above.

Monday, April 5, 2021

Florida works to avoid "catastrophic" pond collapse
Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said Sunday that crews are working to prevent the collapse of a large wastewater pond in the Tampa Bay area while evacuating the area to avoid a “catastrophic flood.“

Manatee County officials say the latest models show that a breach at the old phosphate plant reservoir has the potential to gush out 340 million gallons of water in a matter of minutes, risking a 20-foot-high (about 6.1-meter-high) wall of water.

Monday, April 5, 2021

9/11 Museum acquires prayer bench used by Rev. Mychal Judge
A prayer bench used by the Rev. Mychal Judge, a Fire Department chaplain killed in the collapse of the World Trade Center towers on Sept. 11, 2001, was driven to the New York area on Sunday to join the collection of the Sept. 11 Memorial and Museum, museum officials said.
Monday, April 5, 2021

Capitol fencing: Deadly breach could delay decisions
WASHINGTON (AP) — The latest deadly breach of the Capitol’s perimeter could delay the gradual reopening of the building’s grounds to the public just as lawmakers were eyeing a return to more normal security measures following the Jan. 6 insurrection.
Saturday, April 3, 2021

Few in GOP rush to defend Gaetz, sex trafficking
WASHINGTON (AP) — The political peril for conservative Republican Rep. Matt Gaetz deepened Friday as the often outlandish, Trump-styled provocateur appeared politically isolated amid a federal sex-trafficking investigation.
Saturday, April 3, 2021

Spring is here, and unruly houseplants feel it too

(AP) — No matter that winter winds and snow still come and go in much of the country. The sun’s earlier rising and higher climb into the sky let us know that spring is on the way. Even houseplants indoors feel the changing season.

Saturday, April 3, 2021

Some insects you will want to welcome in the garden
(THE CONVERSATION via AP) — As winter phases into spring across the U.S., gardeners are laying in supplies and making plans. Meanwhile, as the weather warms, common garden insects such as bees, beetles and butterflies will emerge from underground burrows or nests within or on plants.
Saturday, April 3, 2021

This might be the year to grow your own transplants
(AP) — If you’ve never grown your own transplants for your garden, perhaps this is the year to do it. It’s economical, it allows you to grow varieties you might not be able to buy as transplants, it’s satisfying and it’s easy.
Saturday, April 3, 2021

Vibrant new portrait of artist Helen Frankenthaler
(AP) — “Fierce Poise: Helen Frankenthaler and 1950s New York,” by Alexander Nemerov (Penguin Press)

There are doorstop biographies, and then there are appreciations. Alexander Nemerov has taken the latter approach in “Fierce Poise,” his vibrant, sympathetic portrait of Helen Frankenthaler. It focuses on 11 consequential days in the 1950s, the decade when she came of age as one of the leading painters of her generation.

Saturday, April 3, 2021

Review: Lana Del Rey shifts gaze in 'Chemtrails'

Decay and decadence coexist in the world created by Lana Del Rey in "Chemtrails Over The Country Club."

Saturday, April 3, 2021

Take a virtual tour of the Roman Temples of Baalbek
(AP) — The famous temple complex of Baalbek, the ancient Heliopolis in Lebanon, is one of the largest Roman religious sites in the world and part of the world heritage. Baalbek has a rich history that goes back to around 8,000 BC. The remaining six pillars of the Temple of Jupiter are now a landmark of Lebanon. On March 31, the “Baalbek Reborn: Temples” app from Flyover Zone will launch using the latest technology to reconstruct what today’s ruins looked like in the past. On a journey through time, the virtual tour brings this heritage back to life and shows the Temple of Jupiter Heliopolitanus, the Temple of Bacchus, the Temple of Venus and the Temple of the Muses.
Saturday, April 3, 2021

US Capitol on lockdown after report of gunfire nearby
WASHINGTON (AP) — Police locked down the U.S. Capitol this afternoon after a report of gunshots in the area.
Friday, April 2, 2021

Politicians at odds over infrastructure
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden set about convincing America it needs his $2.3 trillion infrastructure plan on Thursday, deputizing a five-member “jobs Cabinet” to help in the effort. But the enormity of his task was clear as Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell’s vowed to oppose the plan “every step of the way.”
Friday, April 2, 2021

March hiring accelerated, yet many jobs remain lost
WASHINGTON (AP) — America’s employers unleashed a burst of hiring in March, adding 916,000 jobs in a sign that a sustained recovery from the pandemic recession is taking hold as vaccinations accelerate, stimulus checks flow through the economy and businesses increasingly reopen.
Friday, April 2, 2021

CDC guidance: Fully vaccinated can travel again
NEW YORK (AP) — Add travel to the activities vaccinated Americans can enjoy again, according to new U.S. guidance issued Friday.
Friday, April 2, 2021

Lieutenant: Kneeling on Floyd's neck unnecessary
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Kneeling on George Floyd ’s neck while he was handcuffed and in the prone position was “top-tier, deadly force“ and “totally unnecessary,” the head of the Minneapolis Police Department’s homicide division testified Friday.
Friday, April 2, 2021

LaHood paid fine to resolve investigation into loan
PEORIA, Ill. (AP) — Former Illinois congressman and U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood in 2019 paid a $40,000 fine for allegedly making misleading statements to federal agents about a loan and failing to disclose it on ethics forms, according to the U.S. Justice Department.
Friday, April 2, 2021

Lawsuits over execution of census coming to end
(AP) — Two legal challenges to the Trump administration’s execution of the 2020 census neared conclusions this week in the face of changes brought by President Joe Biden’s administration since he took office last January.
Friday, April 2, 2021

Amid glow of open day, cloud looms over MLB
ATLANTA (AP) — Amid the glow of baseball’s opening day, there is a cloud looming over the All-Star Game still more than three months away.
Friday, April 2, 2021

For many, this Easter will reflect extra measure of joy
(AP) — For Christians across the United States, Easter services on Sunday will reflect an extra measure of joy as the nation experiences rising optimism after a year of pandemic. Even if still observing restrictions, many churches may draw the largest numbers of in-person worshippers in months.
Friday, April 2, 2021

Cause of Tiger Woods crash found, officials won't reveal it
LOS ANGELES (AP) — The Los Angeles County sheriff said detectives have determined what caused Tiger Woods to crash his SUV last month in Southern California but declined Wednesday to release details, citing unspecified privacy concerns for the golf star.
Thursday, April 1, 2021

North Carolina: Hall of Fame coach Roy Williams retiring
North Carolina says Hall of Fame basketball coach Roy Williams is retiring.
Thursday, April 1, 2021

WHO: Europe's vaccinations "unacceptably slow"
LONDON (AP) — European nations’ immunization campaigns against COVID-19 are “unacceptably slow” and risk prolonging the pandemic, a senior World Health Organization official said Thursday.
Thursday, April 1, 2021

High court: Charlottesville can remove Confederate statues
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Virginia’s highest court ruled Thursday that the city of Charlottesville can take down two statues of Confederate generals, including one of Robert E. Lee that became the focus of a violent white nationalist rally in 2017.
Thursday, April 1, 2021

Boutique stretching resembles therapy and massage
CENTERVILLE, Ohio (AP) — Pandemic-weary Americans starved for human interaction and physical touch are taking advantage of a growing wellness option once reserved for Hollywood actors, rock stars and elite athletes: boutique stretching.
Thursday, April 1, 2021

Ancient coins may solve mystery of 1600s pirate
A handful of coins unearthed from a pick-your-own-fruit orchard in rural Rhode Island and other random corners of New England may help solve one of the planet’s oldest cold cases.

The villain in this tale: a murderous English pirate who became the world’s most-wanted criminal after plundering a ship carrying Muslim pilgrims home to India from Mecca, then eluded capture by posing as% a slave trader.

Thursday, April 1, 2021

Company at heart of J&J vaccine woes has series of citations
The company at the center of quality problems that led Johnson & Johnson to discard an unknown amount of its coronavirus vaccine has a string of citations from U.S. health officials for quality control problems.

Emergent BioSolutons, a little-known company at the center of the vaccine supply chain, was a key to Johnson & Johnson’s plan to deliver 100 million doses of its vaccine to the U.S. by the end of May. But the company has been cited repeatedly by the Food and Drug Administration for problems such as poorly trained employees, cracked vials and mold around one of its facilities, according to records obtained by The Associated Press through the Freedom of Information Act. The records cover inspections at Emergent facilities since 2017.

Thursday, April 1, 2021

One state supreme court strikes down mask mandate
The Wisconsin Supreme Court struck down Democratic Gov. Tony Evers’ statewide mask mandate Wednesday, stripping the governor of one of his last remaining tools to curb large-scale spread of COVID-19 as the state stands on the precipice of another surge in infections.

The conservative-leaning court ruled 4-3 that Evers violated state law by unilaterally issuing multiple emergency orders to extend the mandate for months. The court found Evers needed legislative approval to issue more orders after the initial 60-day mandate he issued in August expired.

Wednesday, March 31, 2021

New York latest to legalize recreational marijuana
New Yorkers can now possess and use up to 3 ounces of cannabis under a legalization bill signed Wednesday by Gov. Andrew Cuomo, while sales of recreational-use marijuana won’t become legal for an estimated 18 months until the state draws up regulations.

Advocates for criminal justice reform hope it will also help redress the inequities of a system that has locked up people of color for marijuana offenses at disproportionate rates. The legislation provides protections for cannabis users in the workplace, housing, family court and in schools, colleges and universities, and sets a target of providing half of marijuana licenses to individuals from underrepresented communities.

Wednesday, March 31, 2021

COVID pushed total US death beyond 3.3 million
The COVID-19 pandemic pushed total U.S. deaths last year beyond 3.3 million, the nation’s highest-ever annual death toll, the government reported Wednesday.
Wednesday, March 31, 2021

G. Gordon Liddy, Watergate mastermind, dies
G. Gordon Liddy, a mastermind of the Watergate burglary and a radio talk show host after emerging from prison, died Tuesday at age 90 at his daughter’s home in Virginia.

His son, Thomas Liddy, confirmed the death but did not reveal the cause, other than to say it was not related to COVID-19.

Liddy, a former FBI agent and Army veteran, was convicted of conspiracy, burglary and illegal wiretapping for his role in the Watergate burglary, which led to the resignation of President Richard Nixon. He spent four years and four months in prison, including more than 100 days in solitary confinement.

Wednesday, March 31, 2021

EU: 'No evidence' to restrict use of Astra Zeneca vaccine
The head of the European Medicines Agency said Wednesday that there is “no evidence” that would support restricting use of AstraZeneca’s coronavirus vaccine in any population, as Germany has now done amid concerns over rare blood clots in people who got the shot.
Wednesday, March 31, 2021

Justices take on NCAA restrictions
The NCAA and former college athletes are getting ready to play ball at the Supreme Court.

With the March Madness basketball tournament ongoing, the high court was hearing arguments today in a case about how colleges can reward athletes who play Division I basketball and football. The NCAA says if the former college students who brought the case win, it could erase the distinction between professional and college sports.

Wednesday, March 31, 2021

Biden eager to build infrastructure
President Joe Biden wants $2 trillion to reengineer America’s infrastructure and expects the nation’s corporations to pay for it.

The president traveled to Pittsburgh today to unveil what would be a hard-hatted transformation of the U.S. economy as grand in scale as the New Deal or Great Society programs of the 20th century.

Wednesday, March 31, 2021

Hunter Biden 'wouldn't repeat Ukrainian work'
President Joe Biden’s son Hunter says his service on the board of a Ukrainian gas company, which Republicans tried to turn into a negative during the 2020 presidential campaign, wasn’t unethical and didn’t represent a lack of judgment on his part.

But the younger Biden wouldn’t do it again if given a chance, he says in a new book, citing partisan politics.

Wednesday, March 31, 2021

Boutique stretching resembles therapy and massage
Pandemic-weary Americans starved for human interaction and physical touch are taking advantage of a growing wellness option once reserved for Hollywood actors, rock stars and elite athletes: boutique stretching.

“It’s like a workout, but you feel way more flexible," a masked Kelly O'Neal, 51, said as her leg was being pulled across her body during a recent session at a newly opened StretchLab studio in Centerville. "I get plenty done after I get done here because you just feel like you’ve warmed up really well.” She said her legs and feet ache after her shift at a grocery store in southwest Ohio — often plus overtime because of COVID-19 demands.

Others cite some intangibles offered by assisted stretching during the coronavirus.

Wednesday, March 31, 2021

A Closer Look At Biden's Infrastructure Plans
President Joe Biden says his proposal for an aggressive series of infrastructure investments would require $2 trillion in spending over eight years but could create millions of jobs. It would be funded by higher corporate taxes.
Wednesday, March 31, 2021

Federal appeals court upholds the constitutionality of a terror watchlist
A federal appeals court on Tuesday overturned a challenge to the constitutionality of the government’s terrorist watchlist, ruling that the government deserves wide latitude in establishing programs designed to protect national security.
Wednesday, March 31, 2021

School plotters often are bullied, suffer from depression
The warning signs are all there.

Students who were making plans to attack schools showed the same types of troubled histories as those who carried them out. They were badly bullied, often suffered from depression with stress at home and exhibited behavior that worried others, according to a U.S. Secret Service study released today that examined 67 thwarted school plots nationwide. Those warning signs are also found in many of the adults who commit mass shootings.

The study by the Secret Service’s National Threat Assessment Center is a twist on the study of school shootings. The group analyzed 100 students responsible for plotting 67 attacks nationwide from 2006-18 in K-12 schools. It’s a companion report to its study in 2019 on student attackers, the most comprehensive analysis of school shootings since the 1999 Columbine High School killings.

Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Dr. Fauci uncertain about WHO findings
A joint World Health Organization-China study on the origins of COVID-19 says that transmission of the virus from bats to humans through another animal is the most likely scenario and that a lab leak is “extremely unlikely,” according to a draft copy obtained by The Associated Press.

The findings offer little new insight into how the virus first emerged and leave many questions unanswered. But the report does provide more detail on the reasoning behind the researchers’ conclusions.

Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Video shows Asian woman assaulted on NYC street
An Asian American woman was attacked in New York City by a man who repeatedly kicked her as two people nearby who appeared to be security guards did not intervene, according to surveillance footage released by police.

The 65-year-old woman was walking in midtown Manhattan a few blocks from Times Square on Monday afternoon when a man approached her and kicked her in the stomach, knocking her to the ground, police said. The man then stomped on the woman’s face several times while shouting anti-Asian insults at her, police said. He later casually walked away, the footage shows.

Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Tennessee flood deaths rise to 6; more rain coming
Tennessee emergency officials have reported a sixth person died in flash flooding over the weekend, and four of the six deaths involved cars.

A vehicle driven by Donna Adams, 61, of Surgoinsville, was swept into Big Creek in Hawkins County on Sunday afternoon, according to a preliminary report from the Tennessee Highway Patrol. Adams was swept out of one of the windows. Her body was found about 20 yards (18 meters) downstream. She is believed to have drowned.

Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Crews battliing Black Hills fires hampered by wind
High winds Tuesday hampered firefighters battling wildfires in the Black Hills of South Dakota that have forced the evacuations of more than 400 homes and closed the Mount Rushmore National Memorial.

Three separate wildfires were burning near Rapid City, with the largest near Schroeder Road in the Nemo area. That fire has burned nearly 3 square miles (7.7 square kilometers) and has not been contained at all. Two smaller blazes were burning southwest of Rapid City, near Keystone, leading Mount Rushmore National Memorial to close through at least Wednesday, as well as surrounding roads.

Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Claims against Cuomo: A look at the women's allegations of impropriety
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is facing allegations that he sexually harassed or behaved inappropriately toward women who worked with him or met him elsewhere — now including one he encountered while on official business. The woman, Sherry Vill, said at a press conference Monday that Cuomo forcibly kissed her cheeks  and made her uncomfortable while examining flood damage at her home.

Other accusations range from groping under a woman’s shirt and planting unwanted kisses to asking unwelcome personal questions about sex and dating.

Tuesday, March 30, 2021

President Biden's first judicial nominees: Black, Asian, Islander, Muslim, more
President Joe Biden has announced his first slate of judicial nominees. The list released by the White House early today includes Black, Muslim and Asian American Pacific Islander candidates among the nine women and two men.
Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Virgin Galactic rolls out latest generation spaceship
Virgin Galactic rolled out its newest spaceship Tuesday as the company looks to resume test flights in the coming months at its headquarters in the New Mexico desert.

Company officials said it will likely be summer before the ship — designed and manufactured in California — undergoes glide flight testing at Spaceport America in southern New Mexico. That will coincide with the final round of testing for the current generation of spacecraft, which will be the one that takes British billionaire and Virgin Galactic founder Sir Richard Branson to the fringes of space later this year.

Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Years later, Chickasaw remains return to Mississippi
A man and a woman were found buried among wolf teeth and turtle shells. Other graves contained mothers and infants. Some tribal members were laid to rest with beloved dogs.

Over the last century, the Mississippi Department of Archives and History has stored the remains of hundreds of Native Americans who once inhabited the state. Most of the remains were found in the Mississippi Delta and range from 750 to 1,800 years old. For decades, they sat on shelves in the state’s collections.

Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Fires in Black Hills force evacuation of 400 homes
Three separate wildfires in the Black Hills of South Dakota have forced evacuations of more than 400 homes northwest of Rapid City and shut down Mount Rushmore, authorities said.

A fire that started near Schroeder Road in the Nemo area, about 15 miles (northwest of Rapid City, had burned as much as 1 1/2 square miles  and was “still moving” on Monday afternoon, according to the Pennington County Sheriff’s Office. Several outbuildings and at least one home have been destroyed, officials said.

Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Vaccines are free, treatment isn't: COVID bills, what to expect
Testing and vaccination for the coronavirus is free thanks to laws passed last year. Treatment isn’t, however, and may be about to get more expensive.

A new vaccine is in production, millions of doses are being administered daily and President Joe Biden says there will be enough vaccines for all U.S. adults by the end of May. That’s great news. But there’s still a risk of getting COVID-19 and facing medical bills.

Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Did COVID stress and uncertainly stall anti-smoking efforts?
A year after COVID-19 upended life for millions of Americans, there are troubling signs that the coronavirus may have also slowed progress against another deadly health threat: smoking.

Fewer smokers called quit-smoking hotlines last year and some smoked more, contributing to an unusual bump in cigarette sales — all in the middle of the stress, anxiety and uncertainty from the pandemic.

Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Giant container ship in Suez Can is finally free
Salvage teams today freed a colossal container ship stuck for nearly a week in the Suez Canal, ending a crisis that had clogged one of the world’s most vital waterways and halted billions of dollars a day in maritime commerce.

Helped by the tides, a flotilla of tugboats wrenched the bulbous bow of the skyscraper-sized Ever Given from the canal’s sandy bank, where it had been firmly lodged since March 23.

Monday, March 29, 2021

CDC director has feeling of 'impending doom'
The head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention made an impassioned plea to Americans today not to let their guard down in the fight against COVID-19, warning of a potential fourth wave of the virus and saying she has a recurring feeling “of impending doom.“

Speaking during a virtual White House briefing, Dr. Rochelle Walensky grew emotional as she reflected on her experience treating COVID-19 patients who are alone at the end of their lives.

Monday, March 29, 2021

Ban on renter evictions during pandemic expanded
The Biden administration is extending a federal moratorium on evictions of tenants who have fallen behind on rent during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Monday moved to continue the pandemic-related protection, which had been scheduled to expire on Wednesday. The moratorium is now extended through the end of June.

Monday, March 29, 2021

'People are letting their guard down'
A year after becoming a global epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic, New York and New Jersey are back atop the list of U.S. states with the highest rates of infection.

Even as the vaccination campaign has ramped up, the number of new infections in New Jersey has crept up by 37% in a little more than a month, to about 23,600 every seven days. About 54,600 people in New York tested positive for the virus in the last week, a number that has begun to inch up recently.

Monday, March 29, 2021

White House still declines to give media access to Border Patrol facilities
White House press secretary Jen Psaki declined to provide a specific date for when the media will get access to Border Patrol facilities temporarily holding thousands of migrant children seeking to live in the United States, but said Sunday the Biden administration was committed to transparency and “we’re working to get that done as soon as we can.”
Monday, March 29, 2021

Emerging Republican candidate announces run for Murkowski's Alaska seat
An early Republican candidate announced plans today to seek the Alaska U.S. Senate seat that has been held since 2002 by Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski.

Kelly Tshibaka, who has led the sprawling Alaska Department of Administration since early 2019, in a statement said she is running “for the Alaskans who believe government is of the people, by the people and for the people. The D.C. insiders need to be held accountable to us.”

Monday, March 29, 2021

China outlines COVID-origin findings, ahead of WHO report
Chinese officials briefed diplomats Friday on the ongoing research into the origin of COVID-19, ahead of the expected release of a long-awaited report from the World Health Organization.

The briefing appeared to be an attempt by China to get out its view on the report, which has become enmeshed in a diplomatic spat. The U.S. and others have raised questions about Chinese influence and the independence of the findings, and China has accused critics of politicizing a scientific study.

Saturday, March 27, 2021

Let the shell games begin in the Illinois General Assembly
Recently seated members of the 102nd General Assembly had introduced 6,950 bills as of March 22. That is correct, it is not a typo and you did not misread.  Almost 7,000  proposals of some variety have been introduced.  In addition, 180 Senate resolutions, 162 House resolutions, 10 Senate joint resolutions, 26 House joint resolutions, 10 Senate joint resolution constitutional amendments, and 32 House resolutions constitutional amendments have been filed.  If you add in these 335 various types of resolutions to the 6,950 bills filed, you have a grand total of 7,285 initiatives filed by 177 elected officials (118 House and 59 Senate members).  That is an average of just more than 41 proposals per member of the General Assembly. Your senator or representative might have filed an above or below average number of proposals.  For the record, that does not make them above average or below average lawmakers.
Saturday, March 27, 2021

North Korea snaps back at Biden
North Korea on Saturday snapped back at President Joe Biden’s criticism of its ballistic missile tests, calling his comments a provocation and encroachment on the North’s right to self-defense and vowing to continuously expand its “most thoroughgoing and overwhelming military power.”
Saturday, March 27, 2021

FEMA vaccination sites to close in California
The Federal Emergency Management Agency plans to stop operating two mass vaccination sites in California next month, just days before the state makes everyone 16 and older eligible for a shot.

The two sites in Oakland and Los Angeles opened in February for an eight-week pilot program that concludes on April 15. The sites will switch from the Pfizer to the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, which requires just one shot, during the final two weeks of operation so that people do not have to sign up for a second dose elsewhere.

Saturday, March 27, 2021

New attempts planned to free huge vessel stuck in Suez Canal
A giant container ship remained stuck sideways in Egypt’s Suez Canal for a fifth day Saturday, as authorities prepared to make new attempts to free the vessel and reopen a crucial east-west waterway for global shipping.

The Ever Given, a Panama-flagged ship that carries cargo between Asia and Europe, ran aground Tuesday in the narrow canal that runs between Africa and the Sinai Peninsula.

Saturday, March 27, 2021

'Treating us like robots': Amazon workers seek union
Linda Burns was excited at first to land a job at the Amazon warehouse outside Birmingham, Alabama. The former nursing assistant had always enjoyed ordering from the company, Now, she would be working for them.

A cog in a fast-moving assembly line, her job involved picking up customers’ orders and sending them down the line to the packers. Now she is a staunch supporter of getting a union at the Bessemer facility. She said employees face relentless quotas and deserve more respect.

“They are treating us like robots rather than humans,” said Burns, 51, who said she is out of leave after developing tendonitis.

Saturday, March 27, 2021

Arkansas governor signs medical conscience objections law
Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on Friday signed into law legislation allowing doctors to refuse to treat someone because of religious or moral objections, a move opponents have said will give providers broad powers to turn away LGBTQ patients and others.

The measure says health care workers and institutions have the right to not participate in non-emergency treatments that violate their conscience. The new law won’t take effect until late this summer.

Friday, March 26, 2021

MLB stadiums pass 1 million vaccinations given
COVID-19 vaccination shots have been dispensed at Major League Baseball stadiums, with the Oakland Coliseum and Marlins Park among the sites planning to continue operating after opening day.

The 11 ballparks that converted to mass vaccination centers in the offseason combined to pass a million total shots this week, MLB said Friday.

Friday, March 26, 2021

Maritime traffic jam grows at blocked Suez Canal
A maritime traffic jam grew to more than 200 vessels Friday outside the Suez Canal and some vessels began changing course as dredgers worked frantically to free a giant container ship that is stuck sideways in the waterway and disrupting global shipping.

One salvage expert said freeing the cargo ship, the Ever Given, could take up to a week in the best-case scenario and warned of possible structural problems on the vessel as it remains wedged.

Friday, March 26, 2021








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